Friday, March 12, 2010

biodiesel waste recycling.

Simple way biodiesel waste recycling.

Scientists in England have managed to convert waste into biodiesel crude amine-amine useful without the need for separation techniques difficult. Glycerol is produced in significant quantities as a side-product in biodiesel production, making it as a renewable raw materials are cheap for the chemical industry.

For example, using the microbes to ferment glycerol is an interesting path to get the 1.3-propanediol, which can be used as precursors for polymers and high-value chemicals platform.

However, the fermentation products produced in dilute solutions together with the material and cell metabolic products of others, making the process of purification and separation is difficult.

Currently, a team of scientists, led by Andrew Marr at Queen's University Belfast and Gillian Stephens at the University of Manchester, had combined with the microbial processes terkatalisis transition metals to produce amines, secondary amines without the need to isolate and purify the diol intermediate compounds.

Marr and Stephens treat bacterial glycerol by Clostridium butyricum, then do centrifugation of a mixture of bacteria, 1,3-propanediol, and by-products to remove cells. This team then added a solution of iridium catalysts, bases and anilin in toluene into the solution, producing a mixture bifase. After 24 hours at a temperature of 115oC, 20 percent 1,3-propanediol has been converted into secondary amines.

"Since fossil fuels are quite rare, the chemists have started to develop new methods to convert renewable raw materials into chemical products and materials that people want," said Marr. "The progress that we have the key is to integrate the processes biokatalitik and kemokatalitik to avoid separation of fermentation products."

"This is an important example of adding value to the resource-renewable resources," said Mark Harmer, a doctoral student at DuPont, Delaware, U.S.. "The ability to use all the components of renewable raw materials will become the key to developing a biorefinery to replace oil-based refinery that is now."

Waste glycerol by Clostridium butyricum treated ago with iridium catalyst, a base and anilin to produce secondary amine-amine.

Stephens agrees: "This new approach will allow obtaining many chemical products from one single fermentation mixture. As far as we know, this is the first time where one-pot approach has been applied by using the product-porduk of microbial cells intact. This approach must be comprehensive, because of their chemical properties can be changed by replacing the non-liquid phase with a mixture of reactants and catalyst alternatives. Microbiological properties may also change, allowing the conversion of raw materials into a variety of fermentation products. "

Simple way biodiesel waste recycling.

Scientists in England have managed to convert waste into biodiesel crude amine-amine useful without the need for separation techniques difficult. Glycerol is produced in significant quantities as a side-product in biodiesel production, making it as a renewable raw materials are cheap for the chemical industry.

For example, using the microbes to ferment glycerol is an interesting path to get the 1.3-propanediol, which can be used as precursors for polymers and high-value chemicals platform.

However, the fermentation products produced in dilute solutions together with the material and cell metabolic products of others, making the process of purification and separation is difficult.

Currently, a team of scientists, led by Andrew Marr at Queen's University Belfast and Gillian Stephens at the University of Manchester, had combined with the microbial processes terkatalisis transition metals to produce amines, secondary amines without the need to isolate and purify the diol intermediate compounds.

Marr and Stephens treat bacterial glycerol by Clostridium butyricum, then do centrifugation of a mixture of bacteria, 1,3-propanediol, and by-products to remove cells. This team then added a solution of iridium catalysts, bases and anilin in toluene into the solution, producing a mixture bifase. After 24 hours at a temperature of 115oC, 20 percent 1,3-propanediol has been converted into secondary amines.

"Since fossil fuels are quite rare, the chemists have started to develop new methods to convert renewable raw materials into chemical products and materials that people want," said Marr. "The progress that we have the key is to integrate the processes biokatalitik and kemokatalitik to avoid separation of fermentation products."

"This is an important example of adding value to the resource-renewable resources," said Mark Harmer, a doctoral student at DuPont, Delaware, U.S.. "The ability to use all the components of renewable raw materials will become the key to developing a biorefinery to replace oil-based refinery that is now."

Waste glycerol by Clostridium butyricum treated ago with iridium catalyst, a base and anilin to produce secondary amine-amine.

Stephens agrees: "This new approach will allow obtaining many chemical products from one single fermentation mixture. As far as we know, this is the first time where one-pot approach has been applied by using the product-porduk of microbial cells intact. This approach must be comprehensive, because of their chemical properties can be changed by replacing the non-liquid phase with a mixture of reactants and catalyst alternatives. Microbiological properties may also change, allowing the conversion of raw materials into a variety of fermentation products. "

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