Saturday, March 20, 2010

Increased acidity.

Increased acidity can be deafening Sea Dolphin.
Nowadays a lot of human activities that cause air pollution, soil and water, which is caused by factory waste, industrial fumes, and many more. One example is that more carbon dioxide entering the earth's atmosphere, the carbon dioxide we produce everyday can cause acid rain and also increases the acidity of the ocean becomes more acidic.

In fact, acidification has been blamed for everything from rock to help kill the algae and even help to measure the fish ear bone strength. But changes in ocean chemistry could also alter the absorption of sound in marine ecosystems, according to newspaper published online on Sunday in geoscience natrure report (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group), that changes in ocean chemistry that makes more noise for the animals that depend on sound to navigate the water depth.

Currently the most contentious is the lack of classification of the researchers of the negative impact of ocean acidification, led by Tatiana Ilyina School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii at Honolulu, writing. "However, less attention from the increasing acidity of seawater is its effect on the absorption of sound in the sea. When seawater becomes more acidic due largely produced by humans is the concentration of carbon dioxide from chemical-sound-absorbing chemicals (such as the decay of magnesium sulfate MgSO4) and (boric acid H3BO3 ()), that sound, especially low frequency rumble (up to 5000 hertz), with further distance.

Using the model outputs of carbon dioxide and the oceans of the world, the researchers found that the absorption of sound could fall by around 60 percent at high latitudes and the water depth in the next three centuries. Adding r sound frequencies lower than the human marine activities, such as construction, shipping and sonar, and you'll really get a frenzied scene for many residents in the sea.

The authors in western countries concluded, "They estimate that during the twenty-first century, chemical absorption of sound in this frequency range [100-10 hertz] will almost halve in some areas that experienced significant disruption emanating from industrial activities,". Some noise at low frequencies caused naturally by waves and rain at sea level and also by the animals themselves. "However, the penlis noted," high levels of low-frequency sound has a number of behavioral and biological effects on marine life, including tissue damage, mass of Cetacean (a type of mammals / whales and dolphins) stranded and temporary hearing loss in dolphins.

Of course, increasing the sound propagation also help some animals aural acuity. Propagation such as sending further communication from the pope on now. . There is evidence that marine species have adapted to the various levels of noise, but the consequences of long-term increase in the frequency of sound transmission is important for many marine mammals are unknown.

Increased acidity can be deafening Sea Dolphin.
Nowadays a lot of human activities that cause air pollution, soil and water, which is caused by factory waste, industrial fumes, and many more. One example is that more carbon dioxide entering the earth's atmosphere, the carbon dioxide we produce everyday can cause acid rain and also increases the acidity of the ocean becomes more acidic.

In fact, acidification has been blamed for everything from rock to help kill the algae and even help to measure the fish ear bone strength. But changes in ocean chemistry could also alter the absorption of sound in marine ecosystems, according to newspaper published online on Sunday in geoscience natrure report (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group), that changes in ocean chemistry that makes more noise for the animals that depend on sound to navigate the water depth.

Currently the most contentious is the lack of classification of the researchers of the negative impact of ocean acidification, led by Tatiana Ilyina School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii at Honolulu, writing. "However, less attention from the increasing acidity of seawater is its effect on the absorption of sound in the sea. When seawater becomes more acidic due largely produced by humans is the concentration of carbon dioxide from chemical-sound-absorbing chemicals (such as the decay of magnesium sulfate MgSO4) and (boric acid H3BO3 ()), that sound, especially low frequency rumble (up to 5000 hertz), with further distance.

Using the model outputs of carbon dioxide and the oceans of the world, the researchers found that the absorption of sound could fall by around 60 percent at high latitudes and the water depth in the next three centuries. Adding r sound frequencies lower than the human marine activities, such as construction, shipping and sonar, and you'll really get a frenzied scene for many residents in the sea.

The authors in western countries concluded, "They estimate that during the twenty-first century, chemical absorption of sound in this frequency range [100-10 hertz] will almost halve in some areas that experienced significant disruption emanating from industrial activities,". Some noise at low frequencies caused naturally by waves and rain at sea level and also by the animals themselves. "However, the penlis noted," high levels of low-frequency sound has a number of behavioral and biological effects on marine life, including tissue damage, mass of Cetacean (a type of mammals / whales and dolphins) stranded and temporary hearing loss in dolphins.

Of course, increasing the sound propagation also help some animals aural acuity. Propagation such as sending further communication from the pope on now. . There is evidence that marine species have adapted to the various levels of noise, but the consequences of long-term increase in the frequency of sound transmission is important for many marine mammals are unknown.

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